Can we agree on the definition of staycation

Can we finally come up with a definiton for staycation and stop altering it to suit our own means?

My understanding, when the term was first bandied around as the new buzz word a year or so ago, was that it was all about holidaying at home. Forgoing the hassle of actually travelling and seeing things within the vicinity of your house that you would normally never go and see. From my Streatham abode, for instance, I could head into London and see some of the sights I’ve not seen since I was a kid, or I could equally head to the South Downs for a bit of a hike.

Predictions of a barbecue summer – yes, thanks for that Met Office – saw VisitBritain and the like jump on the term though and it seems to now mean simply holidaying in the UK. But is that really a staycation when it takes me as long to get to Inverness as it does to the Algarve?

In the last two days alone, Ive had two press releases from two different airlines that show the different meanings.

One from Aer Lingus, still jumping on any PR bandwagon possible as it pushes its new routes from Gatwick, proclaiming that the staycation (ie staying in Britain) was over as thanks to the weather it is now officially the ‘dulcation’.

The other came in from FlyBe (the biggest domestic airline in the UK but with European routes too) that claimed the staycation (staying in your own back yard) was dead and there was a flurry of bookings to Scotland and Spain.

Personally, I prefer the original definition. It makes a ‘staycation’ seem something new, a fresh way to look at local sights and encourages people  to take a more active interest in their immediate area.

When it comes to the ‘bastardised version’, if you travel more than an hour from home and stay elsewhere, you are quite simply on an old fashioned holiday – no buzz words needed.